thedragoninmygarage:

To understand the age and evolution of the Universe and where humans fit into it, imagine that the entire history of the Universe is compressed into one year, with the Big Bang occurring on the first second of 1 January, and today being the last second of 31 December. If we imagine the Universe as a single year, each month equals around a billion years, which means the cosmic microwave background radiation remnant formed in January. Our Galaxy formed around 1 May, the solar system around 9 September, and Earth around 14 September. The first signs of life on Earth appeared around 25 September. Dinosaurs appeared on 24 December but by 29 December they became extinct. All recorded human history takes place on 31 December, most of which from the first cave paintings discovered in Europe to the present day occurred in the final minute.

Credit: Adapted from ‘Cosmic Calendar’ by Carl Sagan

thedragoninmygarage:

To understand the age and evolution of the Universe and where humans fit into it, imagine that the entire history of the Universe is compressed into one year, with the Big Bang occurring on the first second of 1 January, and today being the last second of 31 December. If we imagine the Universe as a single year, each month equals around a billion years, which means the cosmic microwave background radiation remnant formed in January. Our Galaxy formed around 1 May, the solar system around 9 September, and Earth around 14 September. The first signs of life on Earth appeared around 25 September. Dinosaurs appeared on 24 December but by 29 December they became extinct. All recorded human history takes place on 31 December, most of which from the first cave paintings discovered in Europe to the present day occurred in the final minute.

Credit: Adapted from ‘Cosmic Calendar’ by Carl Sagan

(via harmonyoftheworlds)

science!

distant-traveller:

Observing alert – Delta Aquarid meteor shower peaks this week

Watch for the southern Delta Aquarid meteor shower to peak over the next two mornings July 29-30. The best time for viewing for northern observers will be the hour before the start of dawn.

Image credit: John Chumack

distant-traveller:

Observing alert – Delta Aquarid meteor shower peaks this week

Watch for the southern Delta Aquarid meteor shower to peak over the next two mornings July 29-30. The best time for viewing for northern observers will be the hour before the start of dawn.

Image credit: John Chumack

(Source: universetoday.com, via starstuffblog)

science!